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think it's perfectly reasonable that if megan's laws were passed for the first time today, it would definitely include electronic identifiers. so this is merely a reasonable step forward. >> reporter: prop 35 would also increase penalties. traffickers now face five to eight years in prison. the ballot initiative would raise that to 12 years to life and it would push up maximum fines from 100 grand to $1.5 million. >> you really do need to have a penalty that actually gets somebody's attention and causes them to redirect their behavior. >> reporter: but not everyone is on board. former prostitute and sex worker advocate fears it will keep sex workers from reporting crimes against themselves. >> because prop 35 does not have any equal protection for sex workers. there's no way for sex workers to come and report when we're victims of crime like rape, robbery, theft, coercion and extortion to the police because they are most likely to investigate us and arrest us for prostitution than to go after a perpetrator. >> reporter: she is not the only one concerned about proposition 356789 the
to detect and it's not illegal. >> reporter: so there's nothing against the law about gaming the system but what is there about the system that allows it to be gamed here. >> we use a blend of gas not used anywhere else in the country. as a result, when we get know a supply problem, we can't import gasoline that's used in other parts of the country to smooth out that shortage. >> reporter: while the governor's order to allow the winter blend gas to come in is not a long-term answer, at this point the public will take any relief they can get. >> it all counts. 4 gallons for 22 bucks. not cool. >> reporter: it's not cool for any of the drivers here having to pay this much especially when the rest of the nation's gas is even lower than ours by about a dollar. the question, the timing of this? there is nothing like this to get people upset and after all, the election is just a couple of weeks away. >> the timing has people moving. >> whatever. as long as it drops a dime a gallon by midweek. that's all i care about. phil matier at the pumps, thanks. >>> of course what goes up generally comes
into custody. it seems todd knew about maritime law and filed a legal salvage claim against this boat. >> how sharp was this guy. >> reporter: he says a case from 1869 establishes the right of a person to be compensated for rescuing a vessel adrift on the sea. >> on the sea... that boat's going to get sunk or ripped up or that property is going to get destroyed. and because of the pearls of the sea, it's important to energize and motivate strangers to save the property for the benefit of the owner. >> reporter: but the french team's lawyer disagrees. he says the salvage rules shouldn't apply in the bay especially to todd who works at the docks. >> there is an additional rule that we don't want to incentivize people to people who have a duty to render aid to go and claim a ship or boat and then hold it hostage. >> reporter: hagey says the entire french time is in limbo as the boat sits in storage waiting for some kind of settlement. one report says an offer of $25,000 has been made but a court would evaluate the amount based on the value of the boat and the effort it took to save it. >> okay.
for the next court appearance. >> her daughter's presence in law enforcement custody at the safeway was not enough for her to return to the scene. so i didn't think the court or the people would be comfortable that she would return to court. >> erico is being held on $500,000 bail. she is due back in court on october 16th to enter a plea. >>> a bay area man's death overseas has triggered an international health scare. cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran explains it all traces back to a sick bat. >> reporter: it's the county's first death fr rabies in almost two decades. >> rabies still does exist in california. however, it is rare. >> reporter: a 34-year-old contra costa man died from the disease in switzerland in july. once the cdc found out, a full blown investigation started. >> there were four people that we identified that may have had contact with his saliva or other body fluids. three of those did and we offered post-exposure prophylaxis or treatment to them and they received those injections. >> reporter: investigators discovered four months before he died, the man came in contact
-effective. emeryville did away with theirs in june. >> smaller city so they might --they're more law-abiding citizens in emeryville. >> reporter: in oakland the cameras are set up so not every violator is caught. >> the camera doesn't click unless you're moving 15 miles an hour. so for all those rolling red turns which is --there's one intersection in particular, you have to be really moving right through that intersection before you get a ticket. >> reporter: some members of the city council want to explore something else. studies show lengthening the duration of the yellow light can prevent more collisions than a camera. and it's not clear if the cameras are having the desired effect. police say some of the intersections have seen fewer collisions. some have not. >> that's why it's hard for to us make a decision. so i mean, i am asking for more information. >> reporter: councilmembers say since more information is need, they don't think they will vote tonight. instead they will go back to staff ask them to meet with the police department and traffic engineers to provide more analysis and after that
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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